University of California, Riverside

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering



Undergraduate Admissions


The Electrical Engineering Department offers bachelor of science, masters, and Ph.D programs in both electrical and computer engineering.

Electrical Engineering Overview

Circuit BoardElectrical engineers are everywhere. We live in the information and computing age that is the creation of electrical engineers (EEs). EEs invent, design, build, and test the processors, hard drives, memory, integrated circuits, and printed circuit boards that make up your computer. They design, build, and test your iPod, cell phone, the cell-phone tower, and the entire communication network. They built and they maintain the Internet. Electrical engineers work in areas of controls, robotics, communications, signal processing, intelligent systems, computers, circuits, electronic devices and materials. They work in bio-engineering designing biological molecular detectors and using nanoparticles to hunt down and destroy cancer cells. Electrical engineers are essential to modern medicine. Consider all of the electronic equipment that you see in a modern hospital ranging in size and complexity from the blood-oxygen sensor that goes over your finger to the multi-million dollar MRI scanner. This equipment is the product of electrical engineering. The primary professional society of electrical engineers is the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) which has more than 365,000 members and is the largest of all the engineering societies. More information can be found here.

Computer Engineering Overview

The computer engineering programs at UCR are offered jointly by the Department of Electrical Engineering and the Department of Computer Science and Engineering. Detailed information about these programs is available at this URL.

Curriculum

The Electrical Engineering curriculum is designed to provide the student with knowledge and skills in six major areas:

  • Humanities and Social Sciences
  • Basic Sciences and Mathematics
  • Engineering Science
  • Engineering Design
  • Laboratory Experience
  • Computer Skills

The logic that underlies the sequence of courses in each of these areas is described here.

The department recognizes the fact that a major goal of engineering is to contribute to the welfare of society. This contribution is best made when students have an understanding of the Humanities and the Social Sciences. This understanding is derived from the study of world history; political and economic systems; the ethnic, cultural, and religious diversity of the peoples of the earth; the arts and letters of all cultures; the social and natural sciences; and technology. It is strengthened by a stringent requirement in written communication. The requirements in the Humanities consist of a minimum of three courses: one course in World History, one from Fine Arts, Literature, Philosophy, or Religious Studies, and one additional Humanities course. Breadth requirements in the Social Sciences are similarly structured: one course from either Economics or Political Science, one course from Anthropology, Psychology, or Sociology, and one additional Social Science course. In addition, the campus breadth requirement in Ethnic Studies has the option of being incorporated into the above, or standing alone as an additional course.

The engineering curriculum is built on a foundation of courses in mathematics and the basic sciences, which are taken in the first two years at the University. Students acquire a strong grounding in Physics through PHYS 40A, 40B, and 40C. Each of these courses includes an extensive laboratory component. In addition, students obtain a foundation in chemistry through CHEM 1A and 1B, which include laboratories. An additional course in Biology, chosen from an approved list, completes the spectrum of education in the basic sciences.

During the first two years, students take 5 courses in mathematics that cover multivariable differential and integral calculus. These courses, MATH 9A, 9B, 9C, and 10A and 10B, are followed by a course in ordinary differential equations, MATH 46.

Most of the courses in engineering topics are taken after the student has acquired the necessary foundation in mathematics and the basic sciences. However, two lower division courses, EE 001A (Circuit Analysis I) and EE 001B (Circuit Analysis II), are offered in the sophomore year. These two courses introduce basic electrical components and electrical engineering analysis methods. Sophomores also take a course, ME 10 (Statics), through the Mechanical Engineering Department that teaches methods for the equilibrium analysis of structures.

The broad background that is essential for a successful lifelong career in Electrical Engineering is established by the following series of courses. EE 100A (Electronic Circuits I) and EE 100B (Electronic Circuits II) teach the theory of electronic devices and the design and analysis of circuits composed of electroinc devices. EE 110A (Signals & Systems I) and EE 110B (Signals & Systems II) teach the concepts of Laplace and Fourier analysis with applications to engineering systems. EE 105 (Modeling & Simulation of Dynamic Systems) teaches state-space and simulation methods for modeling and analyzing dynamic electrical, mechanical, thermal, and fluid systems. EE 115 (Analog Communications) teaches the fundamental theories underlying modern analog communications systems. EE 116 (Electromagnetics) teaches electromagnetic field theory. EE 120A (Logic Design) teaches the theory and methods for the design and analysis of programmable logic devices. EE 120B (Digital Systems) teaches methods and practices for digital system design at the register and processor level. EE 132 (Automatic Control) teaches design and analysis methods for continuous-time control systems. EE 141 (Digital Signal Processing) teaches the theory and methods of digital signal processing.

The following technical electives allow Electrical Engineering students to establish an in depth expertise in focus areas of their choosing: CS 122A, CS 130, CS 143/EE 143, CS 161, CS 168; EE 117, EE 128, EE 133, EE 134, EE 135, EE 136, EE 137, EE 138, EE 139, EE 140, EE 144, EE 146, EE 150, EE 151, EE 152, EE 160.

The following table organizes the technical electives by areas of student interest.

Most EE courses incorporate design, which addresses real-world problems whose solution requires creativity and consideration of alternatives to achieve stated objectives. Students are introduced to the concepts of design in their sophomore year through EE001A/B.

Design is incorporated into most lower and upper division courses through labs or projects in which students are asked to design a system or a component that satisfies specified constraints. The project is based on material covered in the course. The design may includes the following components: a) Converting the design problem into quantifiable statements, b) Formulating the equations that govern the design, c) Converting the equations into computer code, d) Using the code to optimize the design, e) Consideration of realistic constraints, f) Prototype and test, g) Writing a summary report, and h) Presenting results in front of the class. The design project occupies a significant fraction of course time and the final grade, and is usually conducted in teams.

The culmination of the students' design experience is a two-quarter capstone design course, EE175A and B, in which students draw upon various aspects of their previous engineering science and design knowledge to address a meaningful design problem. The first quarter focuses on project (concept) analysis, preliminary evaluation (economical and technical), data and literature collection, and preliminary process design and evaluation. The second quarter (EE 175B) of the capstone design course focuses on the final detailed technical design, fabrication of a prototype, and prototype testing relative to the project specification. The course concludes with a formal oral presentation and written technical report.

At any time during a students career, they are invited to participate in a circuit prototyping class. This is a non-credit course that teaches soldering, wire wrapping, SMT methods, and printed circuit board (PCB) design and fabrication.

The laboratory courses are based on the ideas that students retain theoretical concepts better when it is reinforced with practical laboratory experience and that students are in the best position to appreciate engineering experiments only when they have familiarity with the underlying theoretical principles. Therefore, EE laboratory courses are directly associated with 23 of 27 EE classes. The only EE classes that do not have a laboratory component are 116, 133, 118, and 150.

Effective use of computers - in the design and analysis of engineering systems - is one of the most important skills required of today's electrical engineers. Efforts are made to utilize computers in all of the electrical engineering courses and laboratories. Students gain three aspects of computer experience:

  • Computer programming: An introduction to computer programming is given in CS 10 (Introduction to Computer Science I). This course provides a working knowledge of structured programming in C.
  • Computer hardware and interface: Computer architecture, processor design, hardware/software co-design, and hardware interfacing are covered in CS61, EE/CS120A, EE/CS120B, and EE128.
  • Use of software packages: The industrial standard MATLAB is used throughout all EE courses. By graduation, students are proficient in the use of MATLAB as an engineering design and analysis tool. The industrial standard PSPICE package is used in all electronic and circuit design classes. The industrial standard XILINX Foundation Tools are use in the 120A/B sequence of logic and digital design classes.

Undergraduate Program Focus Areas

1. Communications, Signal Processing and Networking Fundamental (CSPN) and state-of-the-art theory and applications of communications, networking of devices, and related signal processing, involving information sources in the form of audio, video, image and text messages and transmission media of wire, wireless (radio frequency), fiber optics, etc.

2. Computer Engineering The Electrical Engineering department offers a Computer Engineering program in conjunction with the Computer Science and Engineering department. Example applications are embedded system design, reconfigurable systems, parallel and high-performance computing,microprocessors, nanometer integrated circuit design, and computer-aided design(CAD) techniques. See detailed descriptions in the Computer Engineering Program.

3. Control and Robotics Theory (CR) and design of control of systems and robots. Example applications include control systems in automotive, satellite, aircraft, computer hard drive, robotic manufacturing, autonomous robots, cell phone signal tracking, among others.

4. Intelligent Systems Theory (IS), design and development of systems capable of intelligent decisions. Example applications include video surveillance systems, medical imaging devices, intelligent transportation systems, and manufacturing automation.

5. Nanotechnology, Advanced Materials, Devices Synthesis and Characterization (NMDC)of advanced materials at nanometer scale, theory, design and fabrication of electronic and optoelectronic devices. Example applications include creation of ultra-fast low-power transistors, efficient solar cells for energy generation, high-density memory for smart phones and mobile services, and tiny devices for medical applications.

6. VLSI Design and Systems Theory (VLSI), design and methodologies of very large scale, nanometer integrated circuits. Example applications include microprocessors, analog and mixed signal circuits, RF circuits for cell phones and wireless networks, system-on-chip (SOC), application specific integrated circuits(ASIC).

Catalog descriptions of EE courses can be found at EE Course Descriptions.

Technical Electives and Study Focus Areas

To facilitate student selection of EE technical electives, they have been divided into four focus areas. Close correlation of the TE focus areas with the EE department research areas allows the students to fully benefit from being at a research university. All four focus areas with the recommended technical electives for each area are listed below. For each of the four focus areas, the essential course (listed first in italic under the focus area title) has been identified. The students are strongly encouraged to take this course if they are going to specialize in that area.

Intelligent Systems (IS)

  • EE146 - Computer Vision
    • Next Offered Winter 2015
  • EE140 - Computer Visualization
  • EE144 - Introduction to Robotics
    • Next Offered Spring 2015
  • EE152 - Image Processing
  • EE128 - Data Acquis., Instrum., and Process Control
    • Currently Offered Fall 2014
  • CS122A - Intermediate Embedded and Real-time Systems
  • CS130 - Computer Graphics
Advising:

Prof. Matt Barth
barth@ee.ucr.edu

Nanotechnology, Advanced Materials, Devices and Characterization (NMDC)

  • EE133 - Solid-State Electronics
    • Currently Offered Fall 2014
  • EE117 - Electromagnetics II
    • Next Offered Winter 2015
  • EE134 - Digital Integrated Circuit Layout and Design
  • EE135 - Analog Integrated Circuit Layout and Design
    • Next Offered Spring 2015
  • EE136 - Semiconductor Device Processing
    • Next Offered Spring 2015
  • EE137 - Intro to Semiconductor Optoelectronic Devices
    • Next Offered Winter 2015
  • EE138 - Electronic Properties of Materials
    • Currently Offered Fall 2014
  • EE139 - Magnetic Materials
    • Currently Offered Fall 2014
  • EE160 - Fiber Optic Communication Systems
  • EE123 - Power Electronics
    • Next Offered Winter 2015
  • EE165 - Design for Reliability of Integrated Circuits and Sys.
    • Next Offered Winter 2015
  • EE168 - Introduction to VLSI Design
    • Next Offered Winter 2015
Advising:

Prof. Mihri Ozkan
mihri@ee.ucr.edu

Communications, Signal Processing and Networking Fundamental (CSPN)

  • EE150 - Digital Communications
    • Next Offered Winter 2015
  • EE117 - Electromagnetics II
    • Next Offered Winter 2015
  • EE128 - Data Acquis., Instrum., and Process Control
    • Currently Offered Fall 2014
  • EE152 - Image Processing
  • EE160 - Fiber Optic Communication Systems
  • EE168 - Introduction to VLSI Design
    • Next Offered Winter 2015
  • CS122A - Intermediate Embedded and Real-time Systems
Advising:

Prof. Amit Roy Chowdhury
amitrc@ee.ucr.edu

Control and Robotics Theory (CR)

  • EE151 - Introduction to Digital Control
    • Next Offered Spring 2015
  • EE144 - Introduction to Robotics
    • Next Offered Spring 2015
  • EE146 - Computer Vision
    • Next Offered Winter 2015
  • EE152 - Image Processing
  • EE128 - Data Acquis., Instrum., and Process Control
    • Currently Offered Fall 2014
  • EE123 - Power Electronics
    • Next Offered Winter 2015
  • CS122A - Intermediate Embedded and Real-time Systems
Advising:

Prof. Jay A. Farrell
farrell@ee.ucr.edu

VLSI Design and Systems Theory (VLSI)

  • EE168 - Introduction to VLSI Design
    • Next Offered Winter 2015
  • EE134 - Digital Integrated Circuit Layout and Design
  • EE133 - Solid-State Electronics
    • Currently Offered Fall 2014
  • EE135 - Analog Integrated Circuit Layout and Design
    • Next Offered Spring 2015
  • EE136 - Semiconductor Device Processing
    • Next Offered Spring 2015
  • EE128 - Data Acquis., Instrum., and Process Control
    • Currently Offered Fall 2014
  • EE137 - Intro to Semiconductor Optoelectronic Devices
    • Next Offered Winter 2015
  • EE123 - Power Electronics
    • Next Offered Winter 2015
  • EE165 - Design for Reliability of Integrated Circuits and Sys.
    • Next Offered Winter 2015
  • CS161 - Design and Architecture of Computer Systems
  • CS122A - Intermediate Embedded and Real-time Systems
Advising:

General questions and Student Petitions:

Prof. Ping Liang
liang@ee.ucr.edu

Related Resources

Online Application

Applying to the University of California, Riverside can be accomplished by filling out an application on the University of California website. Here it is, the application. Before you go to it though, please make sure that you have completed all the other steps listed in the on the previous pages in this section. Before filling out the online application, please ensure that you have completed all other steps.

New Student Information

Congratulations on becoming an Electrical Engineering student at the University of California, Riverside. The resources below, as well as those that can be found in the Current Students Section, will be able to assist you in your future at UCR.

More Information 

General Campus Information

University of California, Riverside
900 University Ave.
Riverside, CA 92521
Tel: (951) 827-1012

Department Information

Electrical and Computer Engineering
Suite 343 Winston Chung Hall
University of California, Riverside
Riverside, CA 92521-0429

Tel: (951) 827-2484
Fax: (951) 827-2425
E-mail: E-mail/Questions

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